That’s a Fact!

My oral presentation examines the current federal administration’s idea of “alternative facts” using Michael Foucault’s discourse archeology as mapped out in Dr. McArthur’s book “Planning for Strategic Communication.” By using the technologies of production, sign systems, power and self to parse an actual communication problem, I was better able to understand what Foucault was trying to say, as well as understand the communication issue and what could be done to prevent such an occurrence in the future.

Since my subject dealt with “alternative facts” as proposed by the government, it was also interesting to reread Foucault’s section on governmentality in our text and see how it applied to the Trump administration. Our text states that “As part of his interest in power, Foucault also fixed his attention on what he termed governmentality . . .referring to the complex institutionalization of government power over populations and the formation of specific government apparatuses and knowledges” (Ihlen, van Ruler, Fredriksson, 2009, p. 89). Since the new administration has taken over, Foucault’s theories on power/knowledge are becoming even more relevant as a number of factions, both in and outside of the president’s party, are struggling for power. In light of the recent “stretching” of the truth, it is more important then ever for citizens to work to discern whether the knowledge disseminated by the government is fact, or “alternative fact.”

To record my presentation, I originally used a digital recording device and planned to edit the file using iMovie, but when I played it back, there was an echo that I couldn’t edit out. I relocated to a smaller room for better acoustics and recorded the presentation again using Garageband on my Macbook Pro. With help, I inserted music loops at the beginning and the end of the file, fading out and in where appropriate. The music loops were a part of the Garageband software, and one of the most entertaining parts of the project was sampling the many different loops searching for the appropriate one. Once I completed the edits, I exported the file as an MP3 to post online through Soundcloud.

In the process of this project, I learned about audio production. In previous classes I used Screen-castomatic to narrate and record PowerPoint presentations to post to YouTube, but had never created just an audio presentation. Even though it sounded easier than a multimedia presentation, it was actually more difficult as I had to figure out how to make a presentation interesting to an audience that would be receiving it only through listening, without the benefit of visual aids. Those logistics were challenging, but learning to use Garageband was even more difficult. I had never used the software before and was struggling. I finally, thankfully, found myself under the tutelage of my two grown daughters. It was a humbling experience as I am a computer programmer by education and journalist by occupation, but am far behind in social media and presentation platforms. It is incredibly frustrating as I understand bits and bytes and can even read hexadecimal code, but my six year old granddaughter understands Facebook better than I. I’ve got a long way to go, but I’m getting there bit by bit (see what I did there?!?), and am incredibly thankful for this opportunity to learn.

That’s a Fact!       Click here for podcast

 

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